Little Libraries

Little Libraries

Gwynn Scheltema

I love libraries. I even have a Pinterest board of book spaces and libraries. But I have a special fondness for little libraries; libraries that make the effort despite situational difficulties or lack of resources.

Perhaps it’s because during my childhood, there was but one small library in town, a long car ride from my rural home. Nonetheless, my parents made the weekly trek every Saturday morning, where I chose my six books for the week (the library max). It didn’t take long to exhaust all the books in the children’s section, so the librarian gave me special permission to borrow books from the adult floor. What a treat!

Little Libraries

I especially love “pop-up libraries” or “little libraries” on people’s front lawns. I love that people have taken the time to make them, to stock them with free books, and to trust that other book lovers will use them. This one at the end of my street is nestled in long grass and the sign inside suggests that you take a book, swap a book or donate a book.

This summer, on a visit to Stratford I noticed that there were several little libraries in one neighbourhood and a closer inspection revealed that they were all connected through LittleFreeLibrary.org and each had a “charter number”. Why an organization, I wondered. Were there rules? Expectations for what I thought were purely random, personal fixtures?

 

The Little Free Library organization

Turns out, there are no “rules”. The organization exists to spread the concept across the world and to support those who want to start a little library. They maintain a world map of registered Little Free Libraries to help people find and share books and donate Little Free Libraries to communities where books are scarce through their Impact Library Program.

If you want to create a Little Free Library, the organization offers free Library building instructions, access to free or discounted books through their partners, and an online store that offers Library kits and pre-built Library models.

A global movement

There are currently more than 75,000 registered Little Free Library book-sharing boxes in 88 countries worldwide.

This funky little mushroom-shaped kids Library is installed at Grant Place Reserve playground in Flinders Park, Australia. The builders of this library say, “Our ‘Reading Spots’ give a fun place for kids to read in an awesome playground! We did some fun community art with the kids when we launched the Library, and we put a fabulous sign up on the fence.”

 

 

In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania teacher Johnny Buckley felt that abandoned pay phones could take on a new life of storytelling by transforming them into Little Free Libraries for pre-schoolers.

 

 

And across the pond in Oostakker, Belgium, the makers of this Little Library say, “The model fits our house perfectly, because our house is a hundred years old and has no straight walls, just like the Library. It has the charm of a place with a soul. It reminds us of our childhood, too, with all the colours.”

 

 

 Do it your way.

Of course there are many more unregistered Little Libraries everywhere. If you are considering making a Little Library, how you construct it, the books you stock it with, and whether you do it as an individual or in community doesn’t matter. What matters is that more books become available to more people everywhere.

If you prefer to simply use and enjoy Little Libraries, that’s fine too. Happy reading!