Get that Grant: Write Winning Applications

Get that Grant: Write Winning Applications

 

Wish you could get a writing grant? Stop wishing and start winning with this workshop. Learn how to craft a compelling application that will sell you and your writing project to granting organizations. Dozens of grants are open to writers: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, essays…

Get That Grant is a full-day prep session with hands-on writing activities and how-to tips, so you will:

  • define and clearly state your goals
  • write a project description
  • prepare your writer’s bio or literary CV
  • present your writing history
  • all of which will be invaluable for far more than grant applications

Participants are encouraged to select and bring an actual grant application to work on.

Don’t have a grant in mind? We’ll help you find a grant for now or in the future.

Participants leave this workshop with loads of information, resources and inspiration.

“Thanks, Heather. I had no idea I could apply for research grants.”

“This workshop helped me look at my manuscript in a completely different way. Amazing.”

When: Saturday, October 28, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Location:  NewMakeIt Training Room, 1310 Kerrisdale Blvd. Suite 200, Newmarket, ON

Your presenters:

Heather M. O’Connor is a freelance writer and author. She has won five recent grants totalling more than $20,000, including a prestigious Ontario Arts Council Works in Progress grant and a Marion Hebb Research Grant from Access Copyright.

Ruth Walker

Author and creative writing instructor, Ruth E. Walker taught government employees how to write persuasive bios and CVs, and has won bursaries and creative writing scholarships, and Ontario Arts Council writers’ grants.

Together, Heather and Ruth deliver practical workshops jam-packed with useful information and resources.

 

Register online:

$90.00 +HST
$80.00 +HST Writing organization members discount

Questions? info@writescape.ca

Tax tips for writing income

Tax tips for writing income

Gwynn Scheltema

A query arrived in the Writescape’s comments mailbox last week the gist of which was:

I self-published a book in 2015 and sell via Amazon.com. I received a form in the mail (1042-S Foreign Person’s U.S. Source Income Subject to Withholding). My Amazon book sales are pretty paltry (a whopping $277!). Must I report this on my Canadian tax return? 

I answered in a private email, but thought that this question and others related to writing income may be on the minds of many Canadian writers preparing tax returns this time of the year, so below is the answer to this question and a few more tips about reporting writing income to get you started.

One of the many hats I wear, is that of a tax preparer at a local accounting office, which I have done for decades, so I do know a thing or two about filing Canadian taxes. And since 2009, Writescape has periodically offered a workshop on tax tips for writers and artists.

That said, a caveat: The tips offered here are general information only. Your tax situation could be influenced by other factors not dealt with here, so if you are at all in doubt, contact your accountant or follow the links to CRA’s website for more information.

What kinds of income are considered writing income?

  • royalties/ advances for book sales 9print/e-book) from your publisher (T5)
  • independent book sales, print and e-book, (possible foreign income slips )
  • grants, bursaries and residencies (T5 or T4A)
  • school visits and speaker honorariums (possibly a T4A)
  • access copyright royalties (T5)
  • public lending rights payments (PLR) (T4A)
  • freelance earnings (possibly a T4A)
  • workshops, coaching, retreat facilitation ( possibly a T4A)
  • writing contest winnings

How much do I have to make before I have to report writing income?

Canadian taxation works on the honour system. Even if you do not receive a T slip from the entity that paid you, you are obliged to report all your income from all sources worldwide. That includes sales through Amazon, PayPal, eBay and other websites, books sold at craft fairs, honorariums for being a guest speaker, etc.

Where on my return do I report my writing income?

That depends on whether you are, by Canada Revenue Agency’s (CRA) definition, a “hobbyist” or a “writer” operating as a small business. In VERY general terms:

  • a “hobbyist” reports T slip income on the lines instructed by the T slip. Generally, hobbyists do not deduct expenses, although deductions are allowed on some grants and scholarships.
  • a “writer” operating as a small business (with an expectation of profit), reports all income including income on T5s and T4As as part of business income on form T2125. (Be aware you may have to inform CRA by letter that you are doing so, so that they do not think you forgot to report the T slip income.)
  • any T4 income as a writer or editor is employment income and should not be reported as part of a writing business.

What do I do about income from outside Canada?

  • Foreign T slips you may receive include a 1042-S for the US or a SA103S for the UK.
  • Canadian residents must file worldwide income regardless of whether a return is required or not in the foreign country where the income was generated.
  • Double taxation agreements exist between Canada and many countries, e.g. the US. This means that if you paid tax on certain income in the US, you will not be taxed again on that income in Canada. CRA may, however, charge a difference between rates.
  • Foreign income must be reported in Canadian dollars. You can use the exchange rate for the date/s the income was received, or you can use the Bank of Canada average rate for the year.

 Best for last

  • Most contest winnings are considered “prescribed prizes” and are not reportable or taxable. Yeah!!
  • Unlike employment income, writing business income and grants and bursaries can be reduced by expenses paid to generate that income. What expenses? That’s a whole other blog.

Useful links

 

 

 

Grants: Straight to the Source

Grants: Straight to the Source

Heather M. O’Connor.

When I didn’t know something in school, I was never afraid to put up my hand. Call me curious. Call me nosy. I like answers.

When I started applying for grants for writers, I had lots of questions. I studied the application and searched for reliable resources on the Internet. But grant applications are complex and slippery beasts. You don’t have any examples to follow, and there’s no teacher to ask.

Or so I thought.

Call me!

Most grant applications give you a contact name or an email address. The person on the other end is ready and willing to help you. As one program administrator explained, granting organizations want you to apply. If the number of applicants falls off, so do the funding dollars.

What can these problem-solvers do for you?

 

Approved stamp

Answer questions

What exactly is a project description?” (Marion Hebb Research Grant)

Offer helpful tips

“There’s nothing wrong with asking for the maximum amount. The recommenders can’t give you more than you ask for, but they can give you less.” (Writers’ Reserve)

Share the jurors’ preferences

“They often prefer to read your first chapters.” (OAC Works in Progress)

Tell you news

“Graphic novels now have their own category.” (OAC Works in Progress)

Explain why you were unsuccessful

“The level of writing this time around was very high.” (Canada Council)

Encourage you

“Be persistent. A lot of good writing goes unfunded.” (Every writing grant ever offered.)

Go for it!

The grants are there for the asking. So apply, and do the asking!

I promise you, getting a writing grant feels a hundred times better than getting straight As on your report card. And you can take that–and the grant money–straight to the bank.

What would you use a writing grant for? Education? A writing retreat or conference? Research? Writing time? Let us know in the comments.

Get That Grant workshop

If you think writing grant applications ranks right up there with getting a root canal, Writescape can ease your pain. Gwynn Scheltema and I are offering a hands-on workshop that will walk you through the steps. From finding grants to submitting a polished and convincing application, you’ll be ready to Get That Grant (runs April 16 in Oshawa and April 17 in Bracebridge.)